cottage

News & Events 2015

 

AGM and Club Dinner, Saturday November 21

Our chairman Jonny Grant summed up the 2015 season as being enjoyable, but not the best purely in terms of cricket. The chief cause was the amount of cancellations due to weather and opponents pulling out. Seven games did not happen, and this would have been nine if David Rook had not managed to get Coombe Bissett CC and Croydon CC to step in at the last minute. In the event, we did manage four wins and five draws, with four games lost.
These results are for the full Sunday fixtures and don’t take into account the three T20 games we played [one win, one loss, and one tie]. A consensus in the meeting suggested that we should try to arrange more of these evening fixtures, as we believe there are a number of local businesses that have after-hours T20 sides.
Jon made a point that everyone in Crondall CC would agree with: that although the games are always enjoyable, it is the camaraderie and team spirit that make them really special. Addressing the younger element of the club, Jonny said that elders like him tended to moan about them not doing enough off the field, but this didn’t mean we weren’t really proud to have them on board. The future of the club depends on our young members, and Jon is confident that once he and the other oldies can no longer take such an active role, it is they that will step up.
Finally, our chairman treated the assembled diners to a pre-dessert reading of a poem, “The First Ball” by local cricket poet Arthur Salway. This verse is one of the more memorable:

Rational folk won’t understand just how the ‘first ball’ is
An unassuming watershed between realities.
Work and worry, life and loves are temporarily suspended
To stay ‘on hold’ until the game reluctantly is ended.
The pitch is booked, the players summoned, many a phone call made,
Kit transported, weather fair, the match can now be played:
But the ‘first ball’ is the gambit that bids the best man win,
And states in shining leather – let the fantasy begin.


Jon Grant

Jon Grant presents Alec Goldsworthy with the All Rounder's Cup, and George Osborne wins the Bowling Cup.

James Gunner

Ollie Godden wins the Batting Cup, and James Gunner is awarded the Best Young Player's Cup.

 

Autumn enters as James brings summer to a close

The Indian summer held out just long enough for our final fixture on Sunday September 20, a late finish that we only half expected to happen due to the unsettled weather throughout the summer.
Our opponents, Binstead CC, are a relatively new side and we had no idea how things would pan out. We batted first, making 129 – quite restrained, and a score which our guests could feel was pretty encouraging.
However, Binstead’s reply immediately got into difficulties and no batsman managed to settle down. Maybe they were mindful of their player Julian’s 1930’s Bugatti – no one would want to put a dent in that little beaut.
Ben Ungaretti and George Osborne both took 3 wickets as the Binstead innings struggled, and Skipper Jon Grant gave most of Crondall’s bowlers an over or two. But none of Binstead’s men could exploit the second line of bowling, and runs dried to a trickle.
With one wicket remaining, James Gunner let fly a high looping delivery, which the batsman found irresistible. He stepped forward to heave it into the ionosphere, took a yahoo, missed, and was bowled. Binstead were all out for 61, giving Crondall a 68 runs victory. Great work, James – you’ve put a lot of effort in all season and you deserved to be the one to deliver this coup de grâce.
Thanks are due to David Goldsworthy for stepping in for Crondall at the last minute, and also, thank you to Binstead for your good company during this last day of summer. It’s been a long season that got off to a slow start, but this was a really nice way to wrap things up – bring on next April!

David Twibill

 

team photo

 

Rams rampant!

Whiteditch Rams, formerly known as Whiteditch Wanderers, have recently merged with Ramsdell CC and now share their ground. This arrangement seems to have benefitted them, judging by how they played against Crondall on Sunday September 13.
Reader, they thrashed us. I am tempted to write that it’s been a long season and maybe we were a little complacent, having had good results against Whiteditch in the past. But the truth is they played brilliantly, dominating virtually every phase of the game. Remarkably, the Rams had not played a fixture for nearly two months.
At first, Crondall’s batsmen seemed to have a good grip on the game. Openers Dan Jones and Alec Goldsworthy played positively, hitting 34 off the first 5 overs. Alec eventually fell on 31, caught by Mark Morley off Gary Prickett and Dan had made 21 when he was bowled by the tireless Morley.
George Osborne hung around and worked hard for his 26 before falling to a heart-in-the-mouth catch by Leroy Abbot off Andy McCarthy. Tom Millward showed similar patience, also grafting 26 before being stumped. Apart from these efforts, only David Rook really contributed, ending up on 11 not out.
Crondall were all out for 128. The damage was mostly caused by Andy McCarthy, who bowled off-spin right arm round, finding plenty of life in the wicket. He took 7 for 20 in his 5 overs.
Almost as soon as the last wicket fell, it began to rain. We enjoyed a leisurely (and excellent) tea as it looked more and more as if we would have to abandon the game. However, about an hour after we’d gone indoors we were glad to see the rain easing, and the Rams were able to start their reply.
Dave Chambers and Andy Barrett knew they had all the time they needed, and made sure they played themselves in. They soon began to middle the ball. Andy carried his bat for 67 and Dave had made 50 when he miss-timed a shot off Alec Goldsworthy. This was Crondall’s only chance and it was well-taken, finding the Araldite hands of skipper Jonny Grant, who’s found some great catching form of late.
Crondall had a formidable bowling line-up comprised of George Osborne, Dan Jones, Alec Goldsworthy, Tom Millward, Alex Whittet and Jonny Grant. In the past, we might have defended 128 but this re-vitalised Whiteditch soon made the target look far too low. In autumn sunshine they cruised home, winning by 9 wickets with a few overs to spare.
Congratulations, Rams. On this day you were the better side and over the dark winter days we’ll look forward to next season’s encounter, maybe at Ramsdell?

David Twibill

 

mad hatters

At last, sunshine. This August was one of the wettest on record and our last two fixtures were cancelled, so it was with great relief on September 6 to see a return to summer.
Crondall’s record against the Grasshoppers is a little one-sided, and not one that we tend to pore over, dewy-eyed, during the dark cricketless winter nights. However, Crondall’s total of 158 for 8 wasn’t bad going given the state of the lush outfield, and we felt this total would take some getting.
Opening the innings, Alec Goldsworthy and Ben Ungaretti played themselves in but were unfortunate not to go on to achieve high scores. Alec was bowled for 24 by Tom Millward (who along with me and Jim Cranswick, was on loan to the Grasshoppers) and Ben had made 17 when he was stumped due to the lightning reaction of Alan Fisher.
David Rook steadied the innings with 36 not out, a top score that he shared with Adam Elstow. Apart from a useful 12 not out from Adam’s younger brother Toby, these were the highlights of Crondall’s innings.
Wickets were evenly distributed amongst the Grasshoppers, with Jamie Strachan taking 2 for 14 off 4, and Andy Stradling 2 for 21 off 7. Tom Millward took 1 for 44 off 10, and I was very happy with my 1 for 16 off 4 (Jonny Grant was not so happy).
In reply, the Grasshoppers seemed untroubled by the state of the pitch. Mark Gregory was the day’s highest scorer with 51, and Jim Cranswick didn’t complain about the luxuriant outfield as he blasted 27. The father and son partnership of Mark and Henry Turrell steered the Hoppers home as Mark finished with 24 and thirteen year-old Henry hit a cool 16.
Crondall had called on local boy Pete Short (well, all right – Kettering) to reinforce our bowling. Pete took 2 wickets, one of which was a superb caught-and-bowled when he had to run several metres and dive for it. One other wicket was taken, but that was it. As an autumnal golden tinge suffused Hook Meadow, the Hoppers serenely knocked off the runs.
Hopefully, the Indian summer will last long enough for us to play our final two fixtures in similar conditions. Thanks to the Grasshoppers for bringing us some sunshine, along with a great contest played with true cricket spirit.
There are some nice photos in the gallery section. 

David Twibill

 

Drama in the dark as Military Mappers cause T20 trouble

On Weds September 2 we welcomed the Military Mappers CC to Hook Meadow for a T20 match that had been postponed due to the rainy weather we’ve had lately. We’re at the back end of the season now, and an evening match was pushing things: a prompt start and a healthy over rate were needed if we were to get it done before nightfall.
Crondall’s ten man side included Ed Hellings, who’s been around for many years but has somehow avoided playing for us. At the other end of the age spectrum was Cameron, also playing his first match for Crondall. Both these newcomers acquitted themselves very well as Crondall batted first, and Ed did nimble work behind the stumps when we fielded.
The Military Mappers restricted Crondall to 109; a total which normally would have been under par but bearing in mind the overgrown outfield, we sensed we could defend, even with a man short. Our bowling attack was helped by Scott Shepherd and Tom Millward, neither of whom have played much for Crondall lately. These two were supported by many others (including me) as skipper Jon Grant gave a couple of overs to most of the side. Jon had a captain’s bowling spell and took a superb caught-and-bowled.
However, our guests never looked too troubled, and even though Jon took a further two catches, runs came steadily and it was clear that this was going to be tight. By the final over, the Military Mappers had one wicket remaining and needed just 2 for victory – surely this wasn’t going to be our night? (By then it was night, literally.)
So, the result rested on the broad shoulders of Jim Cranswick, who had the unenviable job of bowling. Everybody came in to save the single and we drew a collective deep breath as Jim ran in. Dot ball was followed by dot ball – did we dare hope?  Then, a run. At last the final ball left Jim’s hand, was hit, and the batters pounced on the single. The ball was stopped and flung into the welcoming gloves of Ed, who whipped off the bails, and the match was tied.
As we groped our way back to the pavilion, both sides congratulated each other for the drama we’d conjured up. Thank you to everyone for making this game happen – it was a real bonus and a nice reminder that summer isn’t done yet.

David Twibill

 

mad hatters

Our fixture with the Mad Hatters has for some years been one of the most keenly anticipated days of the season, and the game on Sunday August 16 did not disappoint the sizeable group that turned out to watch.
Crondall batted first and runs were evenly spread, with David Rook top-scoring on 38, Roger Wiltshire getting 32, and Toby Elstow also making 32 not out. Conditions weren’t ideal for batting: there had been heavy rainfall throughout the previous Thursday and the outfield had slowed up since we last played, making boundaries a real effort. The weather was overcast and the wicket was not as placid as our batters would have liked.
Crondall did well to achieve a total of 188 for 7, even if this may have looked like a shortfall in the light of our making 211 last year, yet still losing by 6 wickets. We were helped in the closing overs by a cameo from Jon Grant, who hit 12 runs.
The Hatters went about their innings with great circumspection. This wasn’t a situation for throwing the bat around, and the Hatters’ top order demonstrated some excellent defence. However, wickets fell throughout the innings and only Tom Richardson really managed to play himself in, scoring a superb century before retiring.
Despite Tom’s marvellous effort, Crondall’s bowlers kept things well under control and as the afternoon turned to evening, an exciting finish looked likely. Jonny Grant, defying the idea that he might rest on his laurels, took a season best of 3 for 53 and in the game’s dying gasps, he was helped at the other end by some good work from James Gunner.
At stumps, the Hatters were 181 for 9, just 8 runs short to match Crondall’s being 1 wicket short. This was the second close draw we’ve had this season and a game that I’m sure we’ll be looking back on (helped by the archive page) for a long time. Thank you to the Mad Hatters and your entourage for helping to make it such a great day.   

David Twibill

 

Twenty-Twenty Trouncey-Trouncey!

When we last played W&I back in June, we won by just 2 runs. On a warm evening on August 12, it soon became clear that our old opponents were determined to keep this momentum going and we found ourselves with a tough game on our hands.
Crondall batted first and like a dangerously overloaded aircraft, the innings struggled to get off the ground. Some skilful piloting from Rob Goldsworthy and David Rook kept us in the air as we lurched towards a total of 91 and to our credit, we managed to get through 20 overs with 1 wicket remaining.
However, W&I’s reply soon made us suspect we might be enjoying the barbecue sooner than we’d thought. This was despite some great bowling from Dan Jones and Toby Elstow (Toby taking 3 wickets), and Rob Goldsworthy also did good work with the ball. Then came a decisive over when Jonny Grant went for three sixes: we now knew our sausages were well and truly sizzled.
W&I won by 4 wickets, with a few overs to spare. It was just as well they didn’t hang about, as the light was failing and fifteen minutes later, we’d have been groping around in near darkness.
This was perhaps not the most glorious 12th we’ve enjoyed, but enjoy it we certainly did. Anyone who has batted on Hook Meadow with the sun setting behind the poplars will know what a special feeling it is to play cricket here. Congratulations to W&I – you wuz robbed the last time we met, and you thoroughly deserved to win this time around.

David Twibill

 

Rowledge romp it!

At Hook Meadow on Sunday August 9 the afternoon was hot and humid with a fair bit of cloud cover. Our opponents, Rowledge Casuals, fielded first and their bowlers soon found the conditions helpful as Crondall struggled to make runs.
Before long, wickets began to fall. None of our batters was able to settle into his rhythm and of the top order, only George Osborne, Dan Jones and Julian Ranger got into double figures; Julian top-scoring with 19. The bowling partnership of Shrubb and Jourdaine did the most damage, each of them picking up three wickets. They were helped by some great efforts in the field.
When James Gunner came to the crease it looked as if Crondall might not reach 100, but when dad Ricky joined him, both of them applied themselves and managed to hang around long enough for the flame of hope to, if not burn brightly, at least smoulder with a neon glow. Their last wicket stand put on 36 runs, with Ricky making 15 not out and James 9. Numbers tell a story, don’t they? Mathematicians will have spotted that extras contributed 12 runs to the Gunners’ stand. In Crondall’s innings, extras were actually the highest scorer in our total of 124; twenty-two wides were particularly helpful.
The weather which had made batting such a struggle earlier on improved after tea, as a fresh breeze swept away any clouds and the sun lit up Hook Meadow in all its glory. Rowledge’s opening batsmen soon began enjoying themselves and Andy Jourdaine made a quick 28 before retiring. His generosity wasn’t wasted as fellow batters Ollie Easterbrook and George Webb got stuck in, Ollie scoring 21 and George 28. The latter was caught by George Osborne off Jonny Grant – it was a difficult running catch, with the ball coming high and fast out of the sun.
Of Crondall’s bowlers, only Jon and Dan Jones were able to take wickets, and Rowledge romped home, winning by 8 wickets.
The Plume of Feathers landlord Julian Badgery made a rare appearance for Crondall – we always enjoy Julian’s hospitality so it was good for us to play the host for a change. Thanks, Julian, for looking after us so royally in the Plume afterwards and congratulations to Rowledge on their well-deserved victory.

David Twibill

 

old isleworth

On Sunday August 2 we welcomed Old Isleworthians/Heston CC back to Hook Meadow, having played them for the first time last season. Once again, the weather was perfect – brilliant sunshine with a pleasant breeze.
By mutual agreement it was decided that Crondall would bat first. The wicket was not the billiards table of two weeks ago and looked like it might offer encouragement for OIHCC’s bowlers. Alec Goldsworthy was bowled for just 15 – an unusual event this season and suggesting this might be a bowler’s day. However, fellow-opener Roger Wiltshire played himself in and began middling the ball, looking as if he does this every day. He made 57 before being caught by “Omar” Sharif off Joe Winders.
George Osborne batted conservatively at first then went berserk, bludgeoning the ball like a seal-culler on speed. When he was eventually stumped after charging down the wicket, he had knocked up 58. Toby Elstow also made runs, contributing an unbeaten 33 to Crondall’s total of 203 for 5.
Crondall were playing with a full complement of bowlers, so it was never going to be easy for OIHCC to overhaul us. Wickets soon began to fall until young Charlie Hester-Cook, coming in at 4, steadied what could have turned into a rout. He was top-scorer of the match with 75 – a great achievement considering the amount of pressure he was under. Joe Winders also looked good and contributed a valuable 20.
The wicket had more runs in it than was expected but this was very much a bowler’s afternoon. That bowler was Dan Jones, who took 5 for 51 in his 9 overs. Congratulations, Dan for your first five-for!  There were two wickets apiece for George Osborne and Jon Grant, and OIHCC had a batsman retired hurt.
Our opponents were just two overs short of saving the match when they were all out for 159, Crondall winning by 44 runs – a much closer result than last year’s match and impressive given our strong bowling line-up. Many thanks for coming down, OIHCC. We’ll see you next year for what we know will be a terrific game.

David Twibill

 

not the mcc

Sunday July 19 saw perfect conditions: warm, bright and breezy, and a wicket that wouldn’t have looked out of place in a snooker hall. Not the MCC reaped the benefits of batting first and although a wicket fell to Toby Elstow on the second ball, they never struggled to find runs and amassed 262 for 4.
Toby’s victim must have had a torrid time watching from the pavilion as the remaining batters piled on the runs. Dav Bal was rampant as he cut and drove his way to 106, and skipper Paul Capleton carved a rapid 82. These two stalwarts were supported by Simon Caunt’s 59. I suspect there was a record number of sixes so far this season, as the ball kept disappearing towards Farnham. One of these landed in someone’s garden on Croft Lane (the lady of the house kindly helped us with the search).
Our bowlers toiled hard and deserved a lot more for their efforts. But ironically, the wickets that fell to Jon Grant and Dan Jones came off deliveries that were less than deserving – each batsman was bowled by a full-toss! It was hard graft for Crondall’s fielders and late in the innings, after chasing balls for more than three hours, it wasn’t surprising that that we missed a couple of difficult chances. By that stage it would have made little difference to the score.
Alec Goldsworthy has been Crondall’s batting lynchpin this season and as he has done so many times, he got our innings off to a great start. Unfortunately, he was brilliantly caught around the long-on boundary when he’d made 82; a century had looked imminent and richly deserved. Dan Jones and David Rook contributed 41 and 29 respectively, Dan falling when he stepped outside the crease to be stumped by the quick-reacting Paul Capleton.
This was a batsman’s day but the Nots returned some decent bowling figures, notably Tom Connor’s 2 for 32 off 7. Their attack was mainly spin and this was compounded when their opening pace man (whose name escapes me) pulled a hamstring and had to resort to my sort of pace. He had been running in with great élan, arms outstretched as if greeting a lover he hadn’t seen for a very long time indeed.
At the close Crondall had made 193 for 5; hardly the cliff-hanging draw of last Sunday, but a decent result in the light of such a daunting target. Interestingly, last year the Nots forced a draw with a deficit of 82 runs, so we know what it feels like to be denied in this way. Thank you Nots, for joining us – maybe next season one of us will get a win!

David Twibill

 

Nail-biting finish as Old Woking step in at the last minute

A last-minute fixture is a bit like a blind date: we’re never sure if we’ll be glad to see the back of our opponents or if it will lead to a fertile relationship lasting many happy years. Although we don’t anticipate having children with Old Woking C.C., our home game on Sunday July 12 suggested the latter.
Batting first, Old Woking quickly established a healthy run rate. This was kept in check by George Osborne, whose fiery pace is never an easy prospect, and he was supported by Scott Shepherd. Scott hasn’t played much this season and although he was more expensive than George, his consistent length and line resulted in the first wicket. Once George had removed the other opener, the flow of runs slowed down.
Old Woking’s runs were evenly distributed amongst their top and middle order – Jake Brannigan top-scored with 30, Lee Stenning achieved 29, and Connor Hockley 22. Dan Jones and Alex Whittet bowled with great accuracy; 1 wicket fell to Alex and 2 to Dan, and neither went for much more than 2 an over. At tea, Old Woking finished with 163 for 6.
In reply, Crondall lost openers Keith Knox and Alec Goldsworthy sooner than we’d have preferred. Alec made a solid 25 and was dismissed just when he looked like he would knock the runs off by himself. But George Osborne soon steadied batting nerves and with great patience, he played himself in and then scored freely, making 53. This would have been much higher had it not been for some dynamic fielding from Old Woking – so many shots looked like certain boundaries but somehow found a man in the deep. As it turned out, these feats made a crucial difference.
Ricky Gunner was hugely impressive, at first taking on the role of anchorman to George but soon scoring runs himself and at one point missing a six by just a few centimetres. He and George were just 1 short of their 50 partnership when he was out for 26.
When Jon Grant came in, things were delicately poised and he applied himself with steely resolve, determined to stay in at all costs. It paid off – Jon was unbeaten on 26.
We have seldom been so evenly matched – for every batting heroic, Old Woking came up with an equal in the field and with the ball. Jake Brannigan added to his batting performance by taking 2 for 30 off 7 and in the final over, when Crondall needed 8 to win, the very cool Lee Stenning took 2 for 4: the match was drawn with Crondall on 160 for 8.
Many thanks to Old Woking – as blind dates go, this was a particularly memorable one. It is a rare thing to find a side that not only matches us in ability, but is also firmly on our wavelength.

David Twibill

 

croydon

Sunday June 28 was a vacant fixture, so we were glad that Croydon C.C. were able to help us out at short notice. The weather during the late morning was wet and cloudy, so driving through 40 miles of rain-drenched Surrey showed some commitment.
We played a 40 over game instead of our usual format, and our guests batted first. To begin with, Croydon’s batters showed discretion, but after a dozen or so tidy overs from Toby Elstow and Ollie Godden, they got into their stride and began to pile on the runs. Jadi top-scored with 57 and he found good support in Dar, who scored 51, and Irfan who knocked up 32. Wickets did fall – Toby took 2 for 28 from 7 and others fell to Alec Goldsworthy, Jon Grant and David Rook. And I – I, that am not shaped for sportive tricks; I took a wicket thanks to a great catch by Keith Knox. However, these never really affected the crop of runs scythed by the merciless blades of Croydon’s talented batsmen, and they finished with 234 for 7.
In the field, Croydon immediately took control with their fine pace bowling attack. Four slips and a gully isn’t something we see very often, and it left us in no doubt that wickets, rather than containment, were their chief objective. A few did slip past the cordon as Alec Goldsworthy began to get into his stride but sadly, he was dismissed for 17 before he could get the big target under control. Ollie Godden was rapidly heading towards 50, but fell on 37 – our top score but an unlucky 13 short. David Rook also gave us some cheer as he nurdled 21, and it was good to see Jim Cranswick back in the Crondall lineup.
Crondall were eventually all out for 150, losing by 84 runs, yet no one looked disappointed at this first loss of the season. Cricket won today – the weather eventually cleared and the closing overs were enjoyed in evening sunshine. Moreover, our guests were as effervescent and sportsmanlike as any opponents we could wish for, never mind that they dished out a bit of a hiding.
Pictures are on the gallery page.

David Twibill

 

Sunday June 21 – the Alec & Alex Show lights up the longest day!

Looking outside as I write on this dismal Monday morning, I see raindrops bounce off my garden path like exploding popcorn. Saturday wasn’t much better. Therefore, we can feel very lucky to have had such a perfect day yesterday for our home game against Oakley C.C.
I am writing with a slight sense of panic because, reader, I have been beaten to it. It is not even 11.30 but already there is a match report posted on Oakley’s excellent website www.oakleycricketclub.co.uk.
Although yesterday was undoubtedly the Alec & Alex show, there was plenty of positive batting from Oakley, who went in first. Notably, Bob Lethaby top-scored with 45 not out and was supported by Jack Brundle’s 31 and a rapid 20 from Oscar Rowley. Alex Whittet, in his first game of the summer, helped keep Oakley’s total to 154 for 7 in his superb spell of 3 for 17 from 9. Bowling from the opposite end, Alec Goldsworthy achieved 2 for 26 from 7. New man Matt White looks a good prospect – wicketless on this occasion but bowling very tidily for nine overs and going for just 23. Toby Elstow and Dan Jones also contributed, Dan taking 1 for 29 from 5.
Oakley were missing one or two of their top bowlers and immediately found themselves under pressure as Alec Goldsworthy cut loose, never putting a foot wrong. He was relentless, completely focused and rarely playing a defensive shot, carrying his bat for 103. Crondall lost Jonny Grant and Julian Ranger, but coming in at no. 4, Ollie Godden provided good support for Alec, scoring 21 not out and sealing Crondall’s victory by 8 wickets.
Many thanks to Oakley C.C. for providing us with a thoroughly enjoyable afternoon – the result doesn’t do justice to the spirit with which they played.

David Twibill

 

T20 Victory at Farnham

On Wednesday June 17 we enjoyed a warm, breezy evening at Farnham Park. Our hosts Wadham & Isherwood played with a verve and determination that caught us unaware, since we had defeated them heavily in both games last season.
Put in to bat, Crondall got off to a flyer with Alec Goldsworthy scoring freely, soon to be joined by Ollie Godden’s and Adam Elstow’s strokeplay. Most of our batters made contributions; Ricky Gunner and Jonny Grant finding some decent form. Jonny was brilliantly caught on the boundary by Ollie Godden, who was standing in for one of W&I’s fielders. Crondall finished with 135; a decent score that should have been relatively easy to defend.
In the event, this total began to look dangerously inadequate as W&I scored freely in their first overs and never stepped off the gas, staying in touch with the required rate of just under 7 per over. This really was anybody’s match and our victory by just 2 runs was as tight a finish as we’re likely to see this season.
Well done to W&I for giving us such a great game, and well done to our bowlers in the closing overs, who kept things under control under great pressure.

David Twibill

 

summer

Cricket has been scarce this season due to cancellations and poor weather, so on June 7 it was good finally to have both a willing opposition and a perfect afternoon.
Crondall’s side was a little depleted, with four or five of our regulars unavailable and the Sons of Bacchus took advantage, batting first and making an impressive 206 for 9. This total was extraordinary considering that Alec Goldsworthy took 6 for 33 in 10 overs. Messrs Casey and Ladenburg both scored 37, and were supported by 25 from Philipson and 22 from Dawson.
Crondall’s reply got off to a leisurely start and with 15 overs remaining, we had lost 3 wickets for just 83. From then on, despite a brisk 30 from Julian Ranger, a draw was the only realistic goal.
The middle order applied themselves to the task of digging us out of trouble and the match was drawn with Crondall on 114 for 5. David Rook and Ricky Gunner played with great patience, denying me the chance to go in at number 8, but I don’t resent them in the slightest.
There are loads of photos of the day in the gallery section.

David Twibill

 

First win of the season as Cryptics crumple

May 17 was our first away game, played at Farnham, as Hook Meadow was being used for a dog show. It was good to carry on our form of last week and record the first win of the season.
Surrey Cryptics batted first and made a decent 189, wickets being shared between George Osborne, Ollie Godden, Adam Elstow and Jon Grant. Their score might have been a lot less if we’d hung on to a number of difficult catches.
In reply, Crondall reached the target with the loss of 4 wickets. Keith Knox, Adam Elstow, George Osborne and Ollie Godden all made good contributions, and Julian Ranger achieved his second 50 for Crondall, finishing up on 66 not out.

David Twibill

 

Jonny trains for Triathlon triumph!

Jonny Grant, never one for sitting down with a cup of tea and reflecting on past glories, has set himself a new challenge. On May 31, he will not only be competing in the Crondall Triathlon, he will also be playing in the T20 match that follows. We're not sure if such a feat has ever been done before – it could be the start of a new Olympic event.
Jon tells me he isn't raising money for any charity, but he might well need one himself after this.

David Twibill

jonny

 

ollies ton

A sunny, breezy afternoon on Sunday May 10th made up for the disappointment of cancelling our first two fixtures due to bad weather. Batting first against Coombe Bissett (whom we haven’t played before), Crondall’s openers Ollie Godden and Alec Goldsworthy got the season off to a firm start with an opening stand of 85. Alec made 36 and Ollie went on to make a brilliant hundred. It was a superb display; he rarely put a foot wrong and offered very little opportunity to our opponents, only once or twice dropping the ball into no-man’s land.
There was one chance that would have been an astonishing caught-and-bowled, had Coombe Bissett’s bowler managed to hold onto it. As it was, he had to jump high to get a hand on the ball and to his credit, achieved a good stop that saved a certain four runs.
The rest of Crondall’s batters did good work, with Adam Elstow making 32 and David Rook 28. Crondall finished on 225 for 4.
In reply, Coombe Bissett struggled to find runs against the pace of George Osborne and Adam Elstow, and George achieved what was probably a record 5 maidens. Coombe’s lynchpin was Brad Rouse, who took advantage of being dropped a couple of times and finished up with 80 not out, carrying his bat throughout the innings. Unfortunately, Crondall’s total became out-of-reach but it was not until the final over, with one wicket remaining, that Brad began to play defensively! His resistance enabled Coombe Bissett to draw with 157 for 9.
Finally, Coombe Bissett’s spinner William Hewlett must be mentioned. Although a mere 13, William created trouble for our batters and had to be treated with respect that defied his tender years. Next year, on our return game in Wiltshire, we expect he’ll be a real handful!
Pictures of the match are on the gallery page.

David Twibill

 

Sunday April 26.

There’s nothing like a glorious sunny April afternoon, packed with exhilarating cricket, to get the season off to a great start. Sunday too, was nothing like this.
The lovely weather we’ve enjoyed for the last few weeks did not last long enough for our 2015 curtain-raiser. So, sadly, Woking and Horsell were once again denied the chance to take on Crondall, as winter prodded its icy finger upon Hook Meadow.
Hopefully, spring will resume for next Sunday’s practice game.

David Twibill